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BEDFORD, INDIANA 2-2-02


On Tues last wk I gave a talk at Lincoln Elementary School in Lawrenceville Illinois, then headed on east where I crossed over the Wabash River into Vincennes Indiana. I'm now in my tenth state and fourth time-zone. The next 3 days I walked in the pouring rain, and that was an experience. The first day I thought it was just going to be a few showers along the way, but instead it rained all day and I ended up with a bad case of chafed cheeks. Wet jeans and wet undies rubbing on my pleasantly plump posterior definitely left an impression (I'm not kidding! Add a little blood to your picture and it'll be about right.) Then the next day I wore sweats instead of denim, and although it didn't rain all day, I did get more than my fair share of grit, grime and tire spray. I had on a white sweatshirt -- well, it was white to start with. After that it was a very grungy dk gray. I was just going to throw it away, but today I washed it twice and it actually came out pretty nice. It would've been perfect for a detergent commercial.
Walking through the towns of Washington, Montgomery & Loogootee are where many Amish people live. Their way of life could be seen in many restaurants, country stores, cheese making, cabinetry shops buggy shops and farms in the area. Nearly 625 old-order Amish families live here in Daviess County. They first settled here in the mid 1800's after the Pennsylvania Amish began branching out. The Amish believe it is very important for Christians to be separate from the world, both inwardly and outwardly. This is reflected in their dress, their form of worship, their language and their use of technology. Amish living in this area have held strongly to their German heritage with German being the first language learned by their children. The Amish strive hard to maintain their heritage and background to which they are very dedicated. They value simplicity, hard work and the closeness of their families. I am now in Bedford Indiana, Land of the Limestone. Established as a county seat in 1825, in 1832 Winthrope Foote went to Louisville KY and interested a stone cutter by the name of Toburn to locate in Bedford and begin working in stone, launching the limestone industry in the county In 1860, Nathan Hall, a stone-cutter from Ohio, built a small mill and began the first commercial quarrying effort of Indiana limestone. It wasn't until Sept 8, 1864 that Bedford was incorporated as a town. In 1911, limestone personnel went to Wash DC to erect the first federal building built entirely out of limestone. It's the US Bureau of Engraving and Printing building. In 1912, the 39 stone mills in this area cut more than 10 million cubic ft of stone which sold for $3.4 million. The stone industry is worth conservatively $6 million by 1913. Then in 1926, the Indiana Limestone Co. was formed by a merger of 24 of the leading independent limestone companies of the time, representing 90% of the area stone industry. They were acquired by Whitney & Co. of Chicago for $25 million. Stone sales in the first 6 mos of the new company were $7,359,604.
Some other well-known places built of Indiana Limestone: Washington Cathedral - Wash DC
the Pentagon Federal Triangle Buildings - Wash DC Dept of Interior Bldg - Wash DC
Lincoln Memorial - Wash DC Empire State Bldg Tribune Tower - Chicago Saks Fifth Ave Store - NY Mayo Clinic Bldg - Rochester MN Rockefeller Center Bldg - NY Indiana, Georgia, Nebraska & Tennessee State Capitols US Military Academy - West Point NY many Universities
I'll be here in Bedford sat & sun night. Call me if you'd like: 812-275-5935 Rm 114. Take care and have a great wkend! KB

 

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